Musk's Starlink is the biggest tech game-changer in history and will kill the cable industry

Starlink is a new telecommunications company that uses satellites to provide internet access to the planet, but nothing like DirecTV and other satellite providers.  Because of true space innovation mocked by leftists, dependence on the globalist networks like Comcast and AT&T for internet connectivity is about to end.

On my current deep-state service provider, I'm getting ~17mbs down/~1.8mbs up.  That's not what was originally advertised, but I'm stuck with it; what else can I do, cancel and go to the other option and get the same speeds and crappy service?  Those speeds drop when I'm connected to my VPN, so I run even slower for most of the day.

Starlink has been rolling out beta testing and has been pushing speeds of ~100mbs.  Musk says the speeds should double and be pushing ~300mbs at some point this year.  Think about how incredible this is:

“Speed will double to ~300Mb/s & latency will drop to ~20ms later this year,” Musk said in a tweet on Monday, responding to a user who showed speed tests ranging between 77 and 130 Mbps.

Latency is the amount of delay in an internet network, defining how much time it takes a signal to travel back and forth from a destination. Latency and download speeds are key measures for an internet service provider.

In a following tweet, Musk added that Starlink will reach customers around “most” of the Earth by the end of 2021 and is expecting to have complete global coverage “by next year.”

We're in horse and buggy-to-car, or flip phone-to-iPhone territory, where society changes overnight.  Comcast and AT&T are about to become the new Betamax and Blockbuster Video.

Solar, the owner of this site, signed up as a beta-test customer a while ago and finally received his Starlink equipment on Wednesday.  He's rural.  How rural?  He lives on top of a mountain, completely off the grid.  He built his own house from scratch, built his own water pump system, and generates his own electricity.  You and I would be eaten by a bear before we engineered that setup.  Solar is Musk's target customer:

He emphasized that Starlink, like other satellite broadband services, is intended for customers in “low to medium population density area.”

“Cellular will always have the advantage in dense urban areas,” Musk said.

Solar's biggest issue over the years I've known him has been his internet.  He can't run fiber up to the top of the El Dorado mountains, so he's been at the mercy of a satellite provider.  His internet has always been slow with ridiculous data caps, and many times I'd send him a video clip I'd want him to watch immediately, but he'd say "I'll check it out.... next month when my cap resets".

He's now clocking ~180mbs down/~30mbs up with no cap.  Unreal.

What I love about his situation is he received the equipment, and everything just worked.  He moved the dish to a few locations to find the best spot, and the equipment is smart enough to find a satellite on its own.  The setup was as simple as you'd hope it could be.

He says the only issue (again, this is early beta-testing) is there's periods of about a minute when the satellite goes out of range until the next one is in view.  Starlink says this problem goes away as they launch more satellites.

The satellites are in low-Earth orbit, which means they're much closer to the Earth than other satellites, enabling them to transmit incredibly fast with far less latency, and with significantly more redundancy than the other satellite internet providers.

An amazing feature of these satellites is they're essentially disposable.  They have a five year life span and are engineered to burn up in the atmosphere when it's time for them to be cycled.  To put another way, they leave no space debris when Starlink is done with them.

With Starlink's tech, the network speeds get faster and latency lower as they insert more satellites into orbit.  I guess it's nice to own a private space company to deliver your equipment to space.

Good luck competing with this:

 

SpaceX launches for Starlink

 

If you're a content creator and deal with heavy video files, you need to sign up with Starlink.  I'm not a creator, but I've helped a friend upload a few videos to his YouTube channel and a few to our own BitChute channel using my current internet service and it brings everything to a crawl.  I can't even upload a video while watching my Fire Stick. (this is actually the reason why I no longer upload videos).

Upload speeds over 10x typical speeds should make life much better for creators.

Internet speed is one luxury of which we don't go backwards.  Remember when you first went from dial-up to DSL and shuddered at the thought of going back?  A new customer of Starlink will always be an ex-customer for life of the cabal-controlled cable providers.

Cable news is a sad joke.  I'm done with professional sports.  Hollywood is a woke pedo-pushing mess, and comedy shows are anything but comedy.  Cable services no longer bring any value to consumers, but we've been stuck with them for internet service.

Content will no longer be forced to travel through the cable network providers in the new Starlink era.

To date SpaceX has launched more than 1,000 satellites for Starlink. In October, SpaceX began rolling out early service in a public beta to customers in the U.S., Canada and the U.K., with service priced at $99 a month, plus a $499 upfront cost for the hardware needed to connect to the network.

The company recently widened the scope of that public beta, allowing prospective users to place preorders for Starlink service. SpaceX, in a filing with the Federal Communications Commission earlier this month, disclosed that Starlink has “over 10,000 users in the United States and abroad,” in just over three months since the public beta began.

Starlink has this incredible speed at $99 per month, and it would make economical sense to digitally purchase movies and shows on demand to circumvent the cabal's cable providers.

Musk's cabal-killing venture will force new innovations, not unlike what Gab has been working on for connectivity between internet and TV.  Devices like Roku and Fire Stick have proven to be an adoptable, and now familiar, move from cable to "watching" internet-based content on your TV.

When Amazon's Fire Stick first hit the scene, I bought it for my mother.  She was perpetually confused about the whole deal.  The concept of switching from cable to the Fire Stick device, where "channels" were now apps you can a la cart, evaded her for the longest time.  Now she flips through them and installs new apps like it was a primal instinct.

We'll always need a way to gather with the family in the living room and plop down on the couch for movie nights and binge shows on the 72" screen.

I watch all TV through Amazon Prime, and alternate video channels like Rumble, GabTV, and Bitchute.  Currently, if I want to binge on "Dexter" (which is currently on Prime) then I have to be locked into a service with AT&T, Comcast, or whomever to have the internet TO BE ABLE to watch the shows.

No deep-state internet provider, no internet.  No internet, no digital content.  No more.

When I do get Starlink, I will not miss a beat with my TV viewing habits, and I will sleep better knowing I'm one more brick removed from the the cabal's castle.

I know, I'm a hypocrite for holding onto Prime, but sooner than later there will be another competitor in some form.  I'm also practicing what I preach, because I used to subscribe to Hulu, Netflix, and watch videos on YouTube.  Those have been cut out of my life entirely, with the occasional YouTube clip.  I'm moving in the right direction.

I'm a "Criminal Minds" junkie, and that kept me on Netflix.  When I cancelled Netflix a few years ago, I made a digital purchase of the series.  Problem solved.

Independent content production will continue to improve.  How many of you watch a podcaster or video creator who started off a few years ago in a bare wall studio with nothing but a camera, table, and had no idea how to get his audio right, but now they have a slick production that rivals major news outlets?  As more content consumers sign up with Starlink, it will force the acceleration of such production.

Starlink is turning the cable industry into a relic overnight.  Once they're done testing and ready for the masses, I'll run from my provider and never look back.

What is the cabal to do?  They can't just give up control of their propaganda networks.  If you're a sympathetic commie, fear not.  The Democrats (enabled by Republicans I'm sure) have an amazing, brilliant, innovative new plan to take the fight to Starlink -- lay more fiber:

"The House has a universal fiber broadband plan we should get behind," Electronic Frontier Foundation Senior Legislative Counsel Ernesto Falcon wrote in a blog post. House Majority Whip James Clyburn (D-S.C.) announced the Accessible, Affordable Internet for All Act, saying it has more than 30 co-sponsors and "invests $100 billion to build high-speed broadband infrastructure in unserved and underserved communities and ensure that the resulting Internet service is affordable." The bill text is available here.

In addition to federal funding for broadband networks with speeds of at least 100Mbps downstream and upstream, the bill would eliminate state laws that prevent the growth of municipal broadband.

No deep-state plan is ever complete without using the powers of the federal government for intimidation:

Tesla CEO Elon Musk is reportedly under SEC scrutiny again, and this time, it’s over some alleged cryptocurrency manipulation, especially Dogecoin.

I take back everything bad I ever said about Musk, and while I may not know his politics, and we may disagree on much, I'm now a big fan and supporter of his.  He broke into the cabal's castle, opened up the steel doors that have kept us prisoner of the monopoly internet providers, and set us free.

AT&T and Comcast are like the Titanic, and they just hit the iceberg while they're continuing to party as if nothing happened with the undercurrent of a quiet panic.  Their ship is about to go vertical and headed towards the ocean floor.

 

Bezos and Musk